thegreenwolf

erikkwakkel:

Medieval surgeon’s manual

These pages are part of a medieval surgical manual written by the 14th-century surgeon Jan Yperman. It describes in detail how to treat various wounds and illnesses. So far so good. It also shows, however, what instruments needed to be used. For a compound fracture of the leg, for example, the jagged-edged scissors in the top image were recommended. And each incision came with its own curly knife on a stick, of course - as shown in the lower image. What’s more, this book-knowledge was by no means theoretical. The book’s dimensions, which is about the size of an iPhone, suggests it was carried around by a 15th-century surgeon on his way to his patients. Break a leg. Or rather, better not.

Pic: Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, MS 3094 (1475-1500). More about the manuscript here.

hoodoo-seed
Never forget that Haiti has no obligation to accept you, no matter how sincere you are or how respectfully you promise to act. Haitian Vodou, the people of Vodou (Vodouisants), and the Lwa owe you nothing and have no obligation to respond to your questions or your interest. If you are not Haitian, you simply do not have an inherent right to own or borrow Haiti’s spirituality, in whole or in part.
Mambo Chita Tann’s blunt opening remarks on entitlement and cultural appropriation in Haitian Vodou: An Introduction to Haiti’s Indigenous Spiritual Tradition. (via humble-seeker)
khenneferitw
khenneferitw:

Today I’m working on filling my prayer jar with requests from the House of Netjer forums. I started the jar with Desh, who has one of her own. She does things slightly differently. You can read about her jar here.
Each of the four sides have the glyph “heka” written on them in gold (UPG: gold is the colour of power).
I write prayers on yellow strips of paper and fold them into stars; after all, everyone knows what happens when you wish upon a star. I use affirmative language (“X will happen”) rather than hopeful language (“May X happen”). I use green ink for “positive” prayers (“X will get that promotion!”) and red ink for “negative” prayers (“X’s hurtful friend will cease their cruelty”), associating green with the powers of growth and red with the powers of destruction.
The jar is sealed and the prayers will be left until the end of the  Kemetic year, when I’ll release the prayers (probably by fire), cleanse it over The-Days-Upon-the-Year, and re-consecrate it on Wep Ronpet.

khenneferitw:

Today I’m working on filling my prayer jar with requests from the House of Netjer forums. I started the jar with Desh, who has one of her own. She does things slightly differently. You can read about her jar here.

Each of the four sides have the glyph “heka” written on them in gold (UPG: gold is the colour of power).

I write prayers on yellow strips of paper and fold them into stars; after all, everyone knows what happens when you wish upon a star. I use affirmative language (“X will happen”) rather than hopeful language (“May X happen”). I use green ink for “positive” prayers (“X will get that promotion!”) and red ink for “negative” prayers (“X’s hurtful friend will cease their cruelty”), associating green with the powers of growth and red with the powers of destruction.

The jar is sealed and the prayers will be left until the end of the  Kemetic year, when I’ll release the prayers (probably by fire), cleanse it over The-Days-Upon-the-Year, and re-consecrate it on Wep Ronpet.

obsidianwitch

archaeologicalnews:

image

A US team in Egypt has identified the tomb of pharaoh Sobekhotep I, believed to be the founder of the 13th dynasty 3,800 years ago, the antiquities minister said.

The team from the University of Pennsylvania had discovered the quartzite sarcophagus of Sobekhotep I, which weighed about 60…